The Process of Audio Mixing (2)

The Music Telegraph | Text 2019/04/29 [15:43]

The Process of Audio Mixing (2)

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2019/04/29 [15:43]

 

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The Process of Audio Mixing (2) 

 

Here are the steps involved in audio mixing a project. However, note that these often interact to a large extent, and at times you may find yourself going back to previous steps or anticipating future ones.

 

5. Make a Rough Mix

Go back to listening over speakers and make a very rough mix of the "naked" tracks. Don't add reverb, signal processing, or anything else to dress up the sound; we're still dealing with the basics. Listen for problems in the general gestalt of the mix. Are the vocals thin? Does the kick drum fight with the bass? Is the bass crisp and full, or muddy, or tinny? Do the synthesized strings melt like honey, or screech? It's a temptation to slap on some signal proessors at this point to improve individual sounds, hut then you're working on the trees, not the forest.

 

An important point about mixing is that any change you make to any instrument affects other instruments as well. For example, you might decide to add more reverb to the drums, only to find that if the strings are heavily reverberated, the two reverb sounds melt together and the strings sound less distinct. Every action does have an equal and opposite reaction: change the bass you'll change its relationship to the kick drum; increase the rhythm guitar's mid-range, and the vocals will have to be louder to be heard. This is why mixing is so very hard: even a dozen tracks have a complex interaction with each other, and each track needs to sound good on its own. It's important to prioritize the order in which you'll work on individual sounds. You should optimize the most important parts first. In pop tunes, begin with the vocals and make everything else subservient to the vocals. Drums and bass are usually next in importance. Work on the "sweetening"; little percussive accents, strings, etc., only after the basics are together.

 

You may want to start off your mix in mono, because placing sounds in stereo can eliminate some problems you might not catch otherwise. If parts fight with each other, you'll discover this a lot faster in mono. Besides, if you can hear each instrument clearly in a mono mix, you'll certainly be able to do so in stereo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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