The Process of Audio Mixing (5)

The Music Telegraph | Text 2019/05/10 [10:42]

The Process of Audio Mixing (5)

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2019/05/10 [10:42]

 



 

The Process of Audio Mixing (5)

 

Here are the steps involved in audio mixing a project. However, note that these often interact to a large extent, and at times you may find yourself going back to previous steps or anticipating future ones.

 

7. Add Signal Processing

Add any signal processing that is an essential part of a given sound. We're not talking about reverb here, but effects that actually change the nature of the part, such as a sixteenth-note echo that makes an eighth-note, hi-hat part seem like a sixteenth-note, hi-hat part, or the phase shifting you put on a synth organ sound to simulate the effect of going through a rotating speaker. This still counts as part of the process of preparing the various tracks for a mix and should be done before you start setting levels and creating a soundstage, our next step.

 

8. Set the Stereo Placement

Start setting up the stereo positions of the various instruments. Generally, the bassier components gravitate toward the center, with sweetening and lesser parts living off to the side. Important, featured sounds should be recorded in stereo and spread across the stereo image. If a sound wasn't recorded in stereo, it can often be turned into stereo via judicious signal processing. Some single point-source sounds, such as vocals, often sound better with artificially created stereo than simply miking the voice in stereo. Drums are the reverse: miking them in stereo (or assigning drum machine sounds to stereo outputs) usually sounds better than trying to process them into being stereo. Other candidates for stereo spreading are drum pads you want to use as a low-level "wash", rhythm guitars, and any other parts that form a "bed" for the lead instruments.

 

The usual way to create stereo from mono is with the use of delay (split a signal in two, feed one to either the left or right channel and delay one a bit before sending it to the other channel), as long as two signals sound different from one another and are panned to opposite sides of the stereo field, there will be some sort of stereo effect. In some cases I've equalized a signal with its bass components on the left and treble on the right, which doesn't create quite as strong an imaging effect - as using delay but does spread out the sound a bit.

 

Any time you spread a mono signal, into stereo, you run the risk of having unnatural alterations should the signals be combined back into mono again (say, - over an AM radio). For best results, always check these kind of parts in mono to ferret out frequency cancellations, timbral imbalances, and other problems. One additional point about panning is that you might try to avoidpanning a sound to the extreme left or right. It seems better to move the pan pot at least a tiny bit toward center from the extreme left or right positions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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