What Music Producer Should Know About Music Rights (1)

The Music Telegraph | Text 2019/01/30 [12:14]

What Music Producer Should Know About Music Rights (1)

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2019/01/30 [12:14]

▲ © BBC



 

What Music Producer Should Know About Music Rights (1)

 

 

 

The use of commercially available records

Do not use the music from a record made for sale to the public in a film, a TV/radio commercial or any other type of audio-visual production without prior permission from the copyright owners.

 

You should obtain this permission from both the record company and the publisher. You must obtain a synchronization license from the copyright owner before usage. That gives you permission to use their music in timed relationship with your production. Failure to do this is an infringement of the Copyright Act.

 

 

 

Performing and Synchronization Rights

Synchronization Rights should not be confused with Performing Rights. A television or radio station may have a blanket ASCAP or BMI Performing Rights license that grants the station the right to perform music on air, but the synchronization rights are never included in such an agreement and must always be negotiated separately with the copyright owners. In the case of an original movie soundtrack album, it may be necessary to also obtain permission from the film company who frequently retains film rights to the music. Any of these copyright owners may also require that the musicians be notified and paid according to their union regulations. Because it can be time consuming and costly to clear the music, many producers find it more convenient to turn to original music or film satisfactory alternatives in existing pre recorded music libraries. However, a recently formed agency, the CMRRA (Canadian Mechanical Reproduction Rights Agency) exists to administer reproduction rights on behalf of copyright owners and this agency can be contacted in Toronto.

 

 

 

Public Domain Music 

Caution should be exercised in the use of Public Domain music. In most countries, copyright exists for fifty years after the composer’s death. However this can vary from country to country and should be confirmed, especially in the case of a production made for foreign use. It should also be noted that later versions, new arrangements or the addition of new lyrics, might have placed the public domain selection back into the copyrighted category.

 

 

 

 

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