Copyright and Licensing

The Music Telegraph | Text 2019/03/15 [12:39]

Copyright and Licensing

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2019/03/15 [12:39]

 



 

Copyright and Licensing

 

 

Make sure you’re protected

We want to make sure your copyrights and the copyrights of your fellow musicians are protected. That’s why Disc makers is one of 11 leading CD plants in the U.S. actively participating in the International Recording Media Association’s (IRMA) Anti-Piracy. Compliance Program, which protects copyright owners from unauthorized reproduction of their property. You must submit a completed Intellectual Property Rights form with your order. If the rights to any recording on your master belong to a third party, you must also submit a completed Audio Manufacturing Agreement or a contract authorizing you to reproduce the recording. Both forms are available online at www.discmakers.com/services/easy-song-licensing.asp.

 

 

Protecting your music

Any song you write is your property, but that can sometimes be difficult to prove in court. We strongly advise that you copyright your original material. Once it is officially copyrighted, no one will be able to record your song without your permission.

The forms you need to copyright your music are available from the Library of Congress. Send them the completed forms, the songs on a tape, and a lyric sheet along with a $35 fee. Once your material has been copyrighted, you can become an affiliate of a music licensing company that tracks the usage of music and payment for the performance rights.

 

 

Using previously released material

When using previously released material, you need permission from the owner of the master. This permission is generally called a Sound Master License or Master Use License and can only be granted by the owner of the master recording, usually the record label, and they often require a fee.

To obtain a Sound Master License, you must find out who owns the master recording. The owner will request information about the track or sample you want to use, the number of CDs you are making, and the countries where you intend to distribute. Send us the required license with your master to avoid any delays of your project.

 

 

Sampling

When you use a portion of another artist’s work on your recording, it is referred to as sampling. Samples can include TV shows and movies, commercial sound bites, and music clips of any kind.

A sample, regardless of length, must be authorized by the owner of the sound master. You will need to go through the same steps to obtain a Sound Master License for sampling as you would to get a license for the entire song.

 

 

Recording your version of previously copyrighted music

When you record a cover version of someone else’s song, you need to get a mechanical license authorizing you to reproduce their composition. You can find out who owns the copyright by contacting ASCAP, BMI, or SESAC, and then contact that partly directly and negotiate your own rate. Or you can contact the Harry Fox Agency, who is authorized to issue license at the statutory rate of 8 cents per song up to five minutes. Songs over five minutes are 1.55 cent per minute per song. Please bite that if the rights to the recording on your master belong to someone else, the owner of these rights must be credited on your artwork. 

 

Contact these companies for more information:

 

ASCAP

(800) 95 - ASCAP

www.ascap.com

 

BMI

(212) 586 - 2000

www.bmi.com

 

SESAC

(212) 586 - 3450

www.sesac.com

 

Harry Fox Agency

(212) 370 - 5330

www.harryfox.com/#/

 

Library of Congress

(202) 707 - 9100

lcweb.loc.gov

 

 

   

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