Historic Synthesizer: Roland D-50 (3)

The Music Telegraph | Text 2019/12/31 [11:28]

Historic Synthesizer: Roland D-50 (3)

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2019/12/31 [11:28]



 

Historic Synthesizer: Roland D-50 (3)

 

Let's assume that all sounds can be broken down into smaller components, and let's look at the sound structure of a piano, one of the hardest instruments synthesizers can simulate. The piano sound consists of two elements: the attack part and the decay part. The initial attack part consists of a hammer sound that hits the string very temporarily and a harmonic component that  represents the string's vibration. After attack, the piano sound has a very long decay time. The  power of harmonics is then resonated with the piano's soundboard. This phenomenon varies from point to point on the piano.

 

 

Traditional synthesizers, especially those using the Subtractive Synthesis (such as most of analog synthesizers), have had some difficulty in accurately reproducing the envelope of the piano.   Those analog synthesizer's envelope was narrow, making it difficult to reproduce piano's sustained decay sound. Also, the piano's harmonic content was so complex that analog synthesizer's  waveform could not produce a piano-like harmonic spectrum. In conclusion, the closer you make a part of a synthesizer's keyboard to produce a sound of piano, the more the other part of the keyboard produces a completely different sound from the piano.

 

 

As mentioned at the beginning of this article, it is Synthesis that makes a whole by combining   smaller parts. L.A. Synthesis of D-50 controls the individual parts of a sound and combines them to create a tone. Some of these tones are PCM sample data, while others are made with Subtractive Synthesis. For the piano sound of the D-50, the front part of the sound used PCM elements, and the decay part was simulated by Subtractive Synthesis. The advantage of the D-50 is  that it can mix harmonics properly and combine the analog synthesis method with the PCM method, making it easy to simulate real instruments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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