Spotting Your First Project (2)

The Music Telegraph | Text 2020/09/14 [12:40]

Spotting Your First Project (2)

The Music Telegraph| 입력 : 2020/09/14 [12:40]

 

© Wikimedia Commons



Spotting Your First Project (2)

 

(Continued from previous article)

 

Next, you will find the specific locations where you think there should be a sound element in your soundtrack (for the dialog, music, and sound effects). You will learn to scrub through the session so that you can pause at any specific spot in the clip. Once you know exactly where each sound should be placed, you will log this information on the cue sheet.

 

 

What are we doing now?

 

Your next task is to go over the video clip and decide what sounds you'll need. You'll start by finding where exactly you need dialog and to whom it belongs (e.g. an actor or narrator). Then, you'll find out where in the film you want music to be played. You'll then do the same for your sound effects. 

 

 

Configuring Pro Tools so you can navigate frame by frame.

 

1) Make sure the Nudge time base is set to "Min:Secs" (Figure 1).

 

 

Figure 1: The Time Base Drop-down Menu

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*Note: The 'Nudge' tool is really designed to move events by whatever nudge value you specify. However, you can take advantage of this feature to scroll through your session frame by frame. The only problem is, you cannot set the Nudge value to a frame in the standard Pro Tools version because it doesn't display SMPTE time code. In order to work around this limitation you can set the time base to 'minutes & seconds' and type the equivalent time of a frame in milliseconds.  

 

 

2) In the Nudge field, type in "0:00.033" (Figure 2).

 

 

Figure 2: The Nudge Value

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Why 33 milliseconds (0:00.033)?

 

Let's do a little bit of math. We know that there are about 30 frames in every second of NTSC video (29.97 to be precise). We also know that there are 1000 milliseconds in one second. To find out how many milliseconds there are in one frame, all we need to do is divide the amount of milliseconds by the amount of frames:

 

1000 milliseconds / 30 frames = 33.333 milliseconds / frame



3) Play your session and watch the movie.

Watch the whole clip and get an idea for the sounds you think should be part of your soundtrack.

 

4) When you're finished watching the clip, press Return.

On a second pass, you'll be focusing on the individual elements, starting with the dialog.

 

5) Play the movie once more from the beginning, but this time, stop when you think you could add a dialog line. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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